Posy Wedding Bouquets

Posy wedding bouquets continue to be a popular choice among our brides. I believe this is because this bouquet style has a contemporary look and is easy to hold

It is amazing how this simple type of bouquet can be styled in so many different ways. An experienced florist will be able to advise you on how to make your posy fit in with your look and colour theme.

Here are some ideas if you are choosing posy bridal flowers

Flowers to Use in Your Posy Wedding Bouquet

natural wedding posy bouquetIf you are looking to create a natural fresh style a mixture of flowers achieves this wonderfully. In the photograph to the left, you can see two different types of roses, lilac freesias, lilac veronica, green hypericum berries and blue thistles.

I also added a small amount of lavender and silver eucalyptus leaves. Not only does this posy create the natural wild garden look, it also smells exquisite.

Many different types of flowers can be used in a posy bouquet, but I think this style of bouquet particularly suits flowers such as roses, gerberas, peonies, tulips and rununculus.

 

Mixed Flower Posy Bouquets

This white posy bouquet (below left) was also created to give a beautiful natural look. The use of gerbera works well and the small brown seed pods were added to coordinate with the wider wedding colour scheme of cream and brown.

white posy bouquet lilac posy wedding bouquet

With the mixed flower posy bouquet you can be quite clever with your use of colour. For instance the bouquet you see above right, was made for a bridesmaid wearing a dress in exactly the same shade of lilac as the freesias, the bride also had cream roses featuring predominantly in her bouquet. So you can mix flowers and also coordinate colours.

Using Just One Type Flower in Your Posy Wedding Flowers

For a structured and stylish look you can opt to use just one flower type such as the rose.

The bouquet below was created using deep red Black baccara roses, which give a sophisticated look. This photo also illustrates the lovely dome-shape to the bouquet that florists strive for when creating this type of hand-tied bouquet.

black baccara rose in a wed hand-tied bridal bouquet

Careful use of foliage can add style and interest to your bouquet without having to add in other flowers. In the photograph below you can see the use of strands of variegated China grass.

pink rose posy bouquet

Personalising your Posy Wedding Bouquet

You can make your flowers personal and unique to you with finishing touches such as a foliage collar, beaded grass and choosing the type of ribboning on the stems.

The hand-tied bouquet (below left) has a collar constructed from steelgrass.

rose hand tie posy wedding  bouquet ribbon handle of wedding bouquet

The stems of your bouquet can be fully covered in satin ribbon or silk to coordinate with the wedding colors. Alternatively a shorter ribbon can be used which leaves the lower parts of the stems exposed (as above right).

Shorter ribboning has the advantage of allowing you to stand the bouquet up in a vase of water, prior to use or during the meal. This could be important if you are concerned about your wedding flowers drying out in a hot climate, or you just want to add another decoration to the wedding table. More styles of handles are on our bridal bouquet design page.

Fall wedding posy bouquetI've noticed it’s becoming more and more popular to have additional decoration to the bride’s bouquet using accessories such as diamantes, feathers, and butterflies etc.

These things can all be easily incorporated into a posy bouquet, and are a great way to make your wedding flowers unique.

You can see this idea in the rununculus bouquet on the left which has a collar of red feathers. This photo was taken in October and I think the the flowers have such beautiful Fall colors.

I hope you’ve now got a few ideas of how you can achieve a variety of looks for your posy wedding bouquet. Have fun designing your own unique version.

For info on styles of bridal flowers , click here

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